Drastic action

There is no room for emotions on a farm. At this time of year, once the olive harvest is in and the farmers settle down to wait for their local cooperativa’s pronouncement about this year’s price [based on the yield of oil from the olives, not on the weight of olives harvested] there is a small pause before the spring cut. In the typical pragmatic way of the Spanish language, the phrase used for pruning the olive trees is ‘to cut’. And boy, do they cut. Lopping off branches, spindly new growth, sometimes most of the tree. It looks brutal. But olive trees live and yield olives for hundreds of years.

5 to remember
una granja – a farm
en esta época del año – at this time of year
el pronunciamiento – the pronouncement
una pequeña pausa – a small pause
pragmatico/a – pragmatic

And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet:
Drastic action: the spring cut. Olive #trees in #Spain via @Spanish_Valley http://wp.me/p3dYp6-1Q4

2 thoughts on “Drastic action

  1. Sharon Bonin-Pratt

    Ack! Some of those look like stumps to me waiting for removal, to be ground down completely. But they will grow back with olives to harvest? I hope so – those are sad looking once-were-trees. I’m going to kiss my olive oil bottle.

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    1. sandradan1 Post author

      Yes, olive trees are amazing. They will grow back and be harvested. Some of the pruning, the Spanish in their economical way call it ‘cutting’, is brutal. But it works. SD

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